Tag Archives: E.C. Brown Foundation

Human and Animal Beginnings, 2nd Ed. (1980)

14 Jun
Director
Producer  E.C. Brown Foundation/Wexler Films (Los Angeles)
Contributors  Made possible with grant from The Foundation for Medical Education of the Los Angeles County Medical Association
Length  15 min
B&W/Color  Color
UO Library Catalog description:   Uses the reproduction of small animals to introduce children to human reproduction. Emphasizes the role of families in caring for the newborn. For elementary grades
Call # Mb278
Genre  Instructional
Rare  YES
Online  NO
Copyright status  Copyrighted
Physical condition  Good
Oregon-related  YES

Notes:

The E.C. Brown Foundation gave a private financial boost for family life and sex education in Oregon starting in the 1930’s.  The three-fold purpose of the then trust and now foundation were 1) the social hygiene on behalf of the youth of Oregon, 2) a reverence for the married state, and 3) the prevention of sexual abuse especially venereal disease.

The first edition of this film, which we have online, was created by Lester F. Beck, an Associate Professor of Psychology as well as a Secretary Treasurer at the University of Oregon.  He also wrote the script for the E.C. Brown Trust film Human Growth, which we have here in our archives as well. At the university, he created the film, Adaptive Behavior of Golden-Mantled Ground Squirrel, which is a film undergoing much research and analysis by our amazing Elizabeth Peterson.

Our library’s catalog does not list who directed this edition.  Even in screening the author of this film is not credited on film.

 

Human Growth 3rd Ed. (1976)

5 Jun
Director John A. Bruce
Producer  E.C. Brown Foundation, Wexler Films
Contributors
Length  20 min
B&W/Color  Color
UO Library Catalog description: Presents adolescent sexual development as part of an overall physical, emotional, and social process. Biological facts of puberty and reproduction in attractive animation are alternated with live comments, questions, and interviews with fifth and sixth graders, junior and senior high students, and young married couples concerning their own feelings and decisions. A brief live birth scene is also included
Call # Mb281
Genre  Instructional
Rare  YES
Online  NO
Copyright status  Copyrighted
Physical condition  Good
Oregon-related  YES

Notes:

The E.C. Brown Foundation gave a private financial boost for family life and sex education in Oregon starting in the 1930’s.  The three-fold purpose of the then trust and now foundation were 1) the social hygiene on behalf of the youth of Oregon, 2) a reverence for the married state, and 3) the prevention of sexual abuse especially venereal disease.

We own the first and second edition of Human Growth as well at the University of Oregon archives and online.

I earlier this year used a text by the director of this film, John Allen Bruce, in my blog for A Family Talks About Sex.  When I found that he also directed this film and was heavily involved with the E.C. Brown Foundation I decided to look into him.  I didn’t find much except that he directed films for and worked with the E.C. Brown Foundation until I came across a paper he published in The Journal of Marriage and Family in August of 1976.  In his study, “Intergenerational Solidarity versus Progress for Women?”, he interviewed mother-daughter pairs (all white, middle-class) concerning whether the mother was employed or not and then the role that mother played in progressing the next generation (i.e. launching their daughter into marriage).

“Resource theory thus directs us to look for a greater marital progress correlation, as we have called it, among mothers who do not work. … While in each category the cor-relation departs from zero at a significant level, so that by our logic we may say that launching remains a mutually important task for all of these respondents, the launching task endeavors are apparently more closely matched when mothers possess less of each resource. It is possible that working mothers may have a different idea of social placement for their daughters. … If parental involvement in mate choice is indeed positively related to later intergener-ational solidarity, is it reasonable to infer from the tentative evidence presented here that the direction of social change presently celebrated for women may have the unin-tended consequence of contributing to a further lessening of closeness between gener-ations? … At our present level of knowledge, how-ever, mothers and daughters may be said to be the most prominent actors in the construc-tion of the next generation, and the evidence presented here suggests that working mothers appear to be less mutually involved with their daughters in this task than their nonworking counterparts. If the research reported here should, in consequence, possibly be predic-tive of greater intergenerational isolation to come, it does not follow that the solution is therefore the responsibility of women alone.”

Source: Journal of Marriage and Family, Vol. 38, No. 3 (Aug., 1976), pp. 519-524

Published by: National Council on Family RelationsStable

URL: http://www.jstor.org/stable/350420

Accessed: 05/06/2012 16:32

Live or Die (1978)

31 May
Director  Larry Yust (also written by)
Producer  E.C. Brown Foundation
Contributors Published by Highland Park, Ill. : Perennial EducationProduced via grant from The Blue Cross of OregonMedical Consultant: James R. Orendurff, M.D.Photographer: Howard Wexler (Wexler Films)
Length  29 min
B&W/Color  Color
UO Library Catalog description:   Through the autopsy findings of two unrelated individuals, a pathologist reconstructs the lifestyles which led to their premature deaths. Points out that each individual is responsible for his or her own health and well-being
Call # Film Mc305
Genre  Instructional
Rare  YES
Online  NO
Copyright status  Copyrighted
Physical condition  Good
Oregon-related  YES

Notes:

“That’s what she died of, but that’s not what killed her.”

The E.C. Brown Foundation gave a private financial boost for family life and sex education in Oregon starting in the 1930’s.  The three-fold purpose of the then trust and now foundation were 1) the social hygiene on behalf of the youth of Oregon, 2) a reverence for the married state, and 3) the prevention of sexual abuse especially venereal disease. At it’s beginning it was based here at the University of Oregon.  We have many E.C. Brown Foundation films here at the UO film archive including A Family Talks About Sex and How to be a Good Kid.

Larry Yust, director and writer of this film worked many times with the E.C. Brown Foundation including on A Family Talks About Sex.  Yust’s film career began with a series of health and safety films for EB made in 1957, followed by a number of science shorts made in conjunction with Dr. Al Baez.  He also made academic films for Wexler Films (via the E.C. Brown Foundation), televison dramas for PBS, and directed three feature films.

HOW TO BE A GOOD KID (1980)

22 May
Director  Larry Yust (and writer)
Producer  E.C. Brown Foundation, Wexler FIlms (Los Angeles)
Contributors   Published by Highland Park, Ill. : Perennial Education
Length  24 min
B&W/Color  Color
UO Library Catalog description: Uses vignettes and documentary footage to encourage the viewer to consider the repercussions of individuals’ actions and to realize that obeying parents’ wishes or following one’s conscience will not necessarily result in happiness. Stresses the importance of acting on one’s best convictions and accepting responsibility for one’s actions
Call # Mc308
Genre  Instructional
Rare  YES
Online  YES
Copyright status  Copyrighted
Physical condition  Good
Oregon-related  YES

Notes:

Another instructional film by the E.C. Brown Foundation.  We have many films by this foundation in our archive including A Family Talks About Sex.

Larry Yust, director and writer of this film worked many times with the E.C. Brown Foundation including on “A Family Talks About Sex” mentioned above.  Yust, whose father Walter was the editor of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, was exposed to films (and filmmakers) at an early age, when his father took him to Hollywood on a business trip for the purpose of collecting data on the film industry for the encyclopaedia. Later attending Stanford University as a drama major, he became involved with the theatre department, and developed an interest in set design, lighting, and directing. After military duty (television programming with Walter Reed Army Hospital as part of the Signal Corps’ Army Pictorial Service), Yust further developed his craft at other television stations, most notably XETV, the ABC outlet in Tijuana.

Yust’s film career began with a series of health and safety films for EB made in 1957, followed by a number of science shorts made in conjunction with Dr. Al Baez.  He also made academic films for Wexler Films (via the E.C. Brown Foundation), televison dramas for PBS, and directed three feature films. He is best known for his outstanding films on dramatic themes.

The E.C. Brown Foundation gave a private financial boost for family life and sex education in Oregon starting in the 1930’s.  The three-fold purpose of the then trust and now foundation were 1) the social hygiene on behalf of the youth of Oregon, 2) a reverence for the married state, and 3) the prevention of sexual abuse especially venereal disease.

A FAMILY TALKS ABOUT SEX (1978)

22 May
Director  Larry Yust (and writer)
Producer  E.C. Brown Foundation, Wexler Films (Los Angeles)
Contributors  Published by Northfield, III  Perennial Education,Grant from Blue Cross of Oregon

Consultants: School of Medicine, University of Oregon Health Sciences Center

Length  29 min
B&W/Color  Color
UO Library Catalog description:   Deals with common situations parents face in giving their children guidance and information about sex. Emphasizes that if the parent-child relationship is based on love, respect, and trust, then there is reason to hope that the children will make responsible decisions about sex.
Call # Mc306
Genre  Instructional
Rare  YES
Online  NO
Copyright status  Copyrighted
Physical condition  Great
Oregon-related  YES

Notes:

“A Family Talks About Sex” is a film made by the E.C. Brown Foundation in the United States, and originally intended for parents, teachers, clinicians and other helping professionals; it has won five major educational film awards. Although the actors vary in appearance and race, the characters remain the same as “the family” grows and changes over fifteen years. The message is one of encouragement for information about sex to be an acceptable part of a family’s life in the context of the family’s larger system of values. The film also endorses and supports the rights and privileges of parents, who bear the responsibility for the family’s well-being. In showingthe film to adolescents, however, I found that the young people themselvesresponded warmly to the concerns of the parents in the film, and that they gained insight into the worries and rewards of parental life.

-John A. Bruce, Executive Director, The E.C. Brown Foundation

 

The E.C. Brown Foundation gave a private financial boost for family life and sex education in Oregon starting in the 1930’s.  The three-fold purpose of the then trust and now foundation were 1) the social hygiene on behalf of the youth of Oregon, 2) a reverence for the married state, and 3) the prevention of sexual abuse especially venereal disease.

 

There is one obvious splice mid-way through the film that cuts off a character’s speech and cuts to a kitchen scene.  Other than that the film is in excellent condition.

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