Tag Archives: NFBC

The Feeling of Hostility (1948)

16 Mar
Director  Robert Anderson
Producer  National Film Board of Canada, US release (1951) by McGraw-Hill Book Co.
Contributors  Mental Health Division, Dept. of National Health and Welfare, Allan Memorial Institute of Psychiatry, McGill University, and Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal
Length  36 minutes
B&W/Color  Blac & White
UO Library Catalog description: A dramatized case history emphasizing the importance of hostility in molding the character and shaping the life experiences of a girl from early childhood to adulthood. For patients in group therapy; students of psychology, psychiatry, and social work; professional workers in the child guidance field
Call # Film Mc5
Genre  Instructional
Rare  No
Online  No
Copyright status  Copyrighted
Physical condition  Good/Fair
Oregon-related  No

Notes:

The Feeling of Hostility was Episode #2 in a series called Mental Mechanisms.  It came with an information sheet and film discussion guide.  It won, jointly with the film Drug Addict, the award for Best Non-Theatrical (live-action) Film at the Genie Awards, April 27, 1949 in Canada.

Robert Anderson was a commonly used director at the National Film Board of Canada and in fact made thirteen films for NFBC.  At the University of Oregon 16mm film archive we not only have Robert Anderson’s The Feeling of Hostility,  but also Breakdown, Over-dependency, and The Feeling of Rejection: Its Development and Growth (all produced by National Film Board of Canada).

Breakdown (1951)

14 Feb
Director
 Robert Anderson
Producer  National Film Board of Canada
Contributors   Distributed by McGraw-Hill Book Co. in US; written by Robert Anderson; photographer, O.H. Borradaile ; editor, Victor Jobin ; music, Maurice Blackburn; sound editing, Kenneth Heeley-Ray; narrators, James Sage and Robert Anderson; executive producer, Tom Daly; photography, Osmond H. Borradaile; sound, Clarke Daprato.  Verdun Protestant Hospital and Crease Clinic, Essondale, B.C.
Length  41 minutes
B&W/Color  Black & White
UO Library Catalog description: Depicts a young girl’s schizophrenic breakdown–the onset and development of the disorder, the effect on her family and friends, her hospitalization in a modern mental hospital, and her eventual discharge as recovered. Demonstrates and discusses modern methods of testing the emotionally ill and stresses the need for a greater understanding of mental illness.
Call # Film Md5
Genre  Instructional
Rare  no
Online  yes
Copyright status  copyrighted
Physical condition  good
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

At the University of Oregon 16mm film archive we not only have Robert Anderson’s Breakdown,  but also The Feeling of Hostility, Over-dependency, and The Feeling of Rejection: Its Development and Growth (all produced by National Film Board of Canada).

Theatrical representation of schizophrenia including its effects on family (from noticing the first signs to the entrance/release from the mental hospital), electroshock therapy, overview of what its like living in a mental hospital, her treatment (including group therapy and electroshock therapy), the role of social workers helping her family, her release (including a poignant piece discussing prejudice in the workplace against those that have been institutionalized) and the future of psychotherapy/cognitive therapy.  This film was made to bring up awareness about schizophrenia, promote modern mental hospitals and their facilities, and most of all to decrease the prejudice against those with mental illnesses and psychological help in light of mental illnesses.

I was interested to watch the film after reading in the library’s catalog description that the girl in the story is admitted into a ‘modern’ mental hospital in 1951.  After being admitted to the hospital they show her in group therapy, which was very rare at the time in the mental health field.  The narrator details how most hospitals are so overcrowded there’s often no possibility for cognitive therapy.

It seems that the film is geared towards an audience of non-professionals to educate and raise awareness about schizophrenia and also other mental diseases.  In the story the young girl’s father is described as one that never talks about his daughter’s troubles or placement in the hospital—obviously representing the common view from that time that issues such as having a family member in need of psychological help were those kept secret and behind closed door.  Directly after the father they detail how her brother understands that it is an illness that she has and that she can get better.  He is not prejudiced and represents a more modern view that the film is trying to proliferate and argue for—that people suffering from mental illness or past sufferers of mental illnesses should not be prejudiced against or treated lesser than person without psychological problems.  Also shown is the warning signs her those around her notice and the difficulties of not understanding a disease affecting one you care about.  The filmmaker’s goal is obviously to have non-professionals relate to the girl and family depicted to make more accessible and less stigmatic the process of psychological treatment and mental illnesses.

Neighbors (1952)

19 Dec
Director  Norman McLaren
Producer   National Film Board of Canada; released in the US by International Film Bureau
Contributors   Producer and Sound Animator, Norman McLaren; photographer, Wolf Koenig; sound mixing, Clarke Daprato. Cast: Jean-Paul Ladouceur, Grant Munro.
Length   9 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  A parable about two people who, after living side by side in mutual friendliness and respect, come to blows over the possession of a flower that one day grows where their properties meet.
Call # FILM Ma134
Genre  animation
Rare  no
Online  yes; Google Video
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Availability on Norman McLaren: The Master’s Edition DVD setwhich includes all of his films. Original title has English or Canadian “u” in title. Landmark, Oscar-winning (Documentary Short Subject) pixilated (and partially stop-motion animated) film.

Nails (1980)

19 Dec
Director   Philip Borsos
Producer   National Film Board of Canada, Mercury Pictures (distributor/producer, respectively).
Contributors   Editor, Raymond Hall; cinematography, Ron Orieux.
Length   13 min
B&W/Color  color
UO Library Catalog description:  Using the ordinary nail as a symbol of industrial growth, this production juxtaposes the blacksmith’s slow craftsman’s approach with the mass production methods of today.
Call # FILM Mb273
Genre  documentary
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

From NFB site: “A blacksmith is seen laboring at his forge, shaping nails from single strands of steel rods. The scene shifts from this peaceful setting to the roar of a twentieth-century nail mill, where banks of machines draw, cut, and pound the steel rods faster than the eye can follow. The scene then shifts back to a nineteenth-century nail factory. These diametrically opposed scenes emphasize the changed relationship between the individual and his work. Film without words.” Oscar-nominated like (apparently) all NFBC films. Nothing I’ve immediately heard of, but Orieux is a very prolific cinematographer.

Lonely Boy (1962)

17 Dec
Director   Wolf Koenig, Roman Kroitor
Producer   National Film Board of Canada
Contributors   Editors, John Spotton, Guy L. Côté
Length   27 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  Describes the rise to fame of Paul Anka, a young Canadian songwriter and singer. Presents a candid look at the popular singer from both sides of the footlights, discussing the reaction of American teenagers and other fans, telling how his manager feels about him, and what he thinks about himself.
Call # FILM Mc140
Genre  documentary
Rare  no
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  good
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

With an astounding eye for detail, directors Wolf Koenig and Roman Kroitor capture the minutia of the day-to-day life of teen heart throb Paul Anka during the glory days of his early career — everything from his screaming adolescent fans to his sleazy managers. Lonely Boy, a direct cinema documentary, was undoubtedly one of the greatest films from the NFB’s Unit B. It represented a major development in the Candid Eye approach (from an emphasis on re cording the external appearance of things to a more probing, quizzical style) while retaining the essentially humanistic world view of the Unit B filmmakers.”

Legault’s Place (1965)

17 Dec
Director   Suzanne Angel
Producer   Made and released by National Film Board of Canada.
Contributors   Producers, Roman Krolter, Tom Daly; Commentary, Stanley Jackson; Cameraman, John Spotton.
Length   10 min
B&W/Color   b&w
UO Library Catalog description:  A story about an old man who wanted from life only to be left in peace to live with his memories in the familiar comfort of his aging cabin. Tells how the city began to build around him, how he evaded eviction, and how he eventually became wealthy from the sale of his cabin
Call # FILM Ma157
Genre  documentary
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

As with most NFBC films, the DVD rights are still active. There is a Suzanne Angel who is a prolific Hollywood sound person, but this is another one; she also made a short feature called Two Men of Montreal which also somehow involved Leonard Cohen.

Hot Stuff (1971)

16 Dec
Director  Zlatko Grgic
Producer  Dominion Fire Commissioner, Dept. of Public Works, Ottawa. Made and released by National Film Board of Canada.
Contributors  Producers, Robert Verrall, Wolf Koenig; story, Don Arioli; music, Bill Brooks; animation camera, Simon Leblanc; voices, Don Arioli, Gerald Budner, John Howe
Length  9 min
B&W/Color  color
UO Library Catalog description:  An animated film which warns of the dangers of fire that is allowed to get out of control.
Call # FILM Ma211
Genre  instructional
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Actually begins with gods creating the world, then uses the story of a caveman and his snake friend (or Adam and the serpent?) to demonstrate fire safety before moving on to a hateful couple who destroy everything they touch with fire. A horrifying film on pretty much every possible level. Eva Szasz, director of Cosmic Zoom, is credited onscreen as being part of the animation team.

The Feeling of Rejection: Its Development and Growth (1947)

15 Dec
Director  Robert Anderson
Producer  Produced for the Mental Health Division of the Department of National Health and Welfare by the National Film Board of Canada
Contributors  Produced and directed by Robert Anderson ; camera, Dennis Gillson ; music, Robert Fleming ; sound, J.P. Champagne ; editing, Victor Jobin ; script by Bruce Ruddick. “Prepared with the technical advice of the medical staff of the Allan Memorial Institute of Psychiatry, McGill University and the Royal Victoria Hospital, Montreal.” Actors: Wanda Allen, J.D. Macbeth, Helen Smith, Robin Taylor.
Length  23 min
B&W/Color  b&w
UO Library Catalog description:  This is the dramatization of the case history of Margaret, a 23 year old girl who has physical disorders with no physical cause. A psychiatrist, probing Margaret’s past, shows her the root of her troubles–childhood overprotection and discouragement of her efforts to express herself, resulting in a crippling fear of failure and a complete inability to assert herself. When Margaret understands her problem, she begins to handle it, starting new and healthier habits of behavior.
Call # FILM Mb18
Genre  documentary
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  poor
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

It’s not listed in WorldCat at all. UO catalog notes, tersely, “live” – which seemed to imply that the dramatization takes place in real time; as it turns out, though, it’s done in a feature style with sparse voice-overs from the doctor. Some camp moments, but it is competently scripted and shot both beautifully and ambitiously. Robert Anderson directed a lot of Canadian educational and documentary films, including Drug Addict and The Feeling of Hostility. Bruce Ruddick worked with him a few more times. None of the actors has any additional roles.

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