Archive | December, 2011

Your Voice (1949)

21 Dec
Director 
Producer   Encyclopaedia Britannica Films
Contributors   Collaborators, William J. Temple, Delinda Roggensack.
Length   11 min
B&W/Color   b&w
UO Library Catalog description:  Describes the four phases of voice production: respiration, phonation, resonance, and articulation. Presents actual photography of the vocal folds in operation. Animated drawings, together with demonstration material, explain the various processes. Emphasizes the role of proper exercises for improving the voice: illustrates the use of the voice in speaking and singing.
Call # FILM Ma91
Genre  instructional
Rare  no
Online  no
Copyright status  public domain
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Ms. Roggensack had an M.A. in music from Cornell College and published books and articles about music education. William J. Temple (PhD, Brooklyn College) was a speech pathologist who edited the core Quarterly Journal of Speech. The Journal of the American Medical Association gave the film a favorable review in 1950.

The Women’s Prejudice Film (1974)

21 Dec
Director 
Producer   Sandler Institutional Films
Contributors   Producer, Allan F. Sandler; director, Ray Rivas; writer, Bob Emenegger; host, Susan Oliver; editor Caryl Wickman
Length   19 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  Examines myths, clichés, and questionable concepts about women and provides alternative viewpoints in order to stimulate men and women to reappraise current attitudes concerning equality between the sexes
Call # FILM Mb226
Genre  documentary
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  public domain
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Sandler Institutuaional seems to have had a consistent stable of creators (Rivas and Emenegger also worked, for example, on 1976’s UFOS: It Has Begun, hosted by Rod Serling). In the late seventies and early eighties, they turned primarily to made-for-TV science-fiction films. There is a Sandler in business now, and I suspect they may be the same company, having made a return to instructional genre – a lot of their titles (for example Junkfood Film and Suicide Film) have a familiar format.

Women in Management: Threat or Opportunity? (1975)

21 Dec
Director   Barbara Jampel (also wrote and produced the film)
Producer   CRM/McGraw-Hill
Contributors 
Length   30 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  Examines the stereotypes commonly associated with women in business. Shows how a program at Weyerhaeuser Lumber Co. has helped men and women deal with the new relationships caused by affirmative action programs and the new role for women.
Call # FILM Mc227
Genre  documentary
Rare  no
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

WorldCat says it’s partial animation. IMDB has a Barbara Jampel with (very roughly) the right timeframe and focus (though it lists her as becoming active ten years after this film). We have another of her films, Sex Role Development.

Winsor McCay, America’s Greatest Cartoonist, And Gertie (1970)

21 Dec
Director   Winsor McCay
Producer   Blackhawk Films (restoration)
Contributors   Winsor McCay, George McManus, Roy McCardell
Length   22 min
B&W/Color   b&w
UO Library Catalog description:  Winsor McCay, America’s greatest cartoonist, and Gertie (1909): Based on the vaudeville novelty, with McCay supplying onstage commentary and sound effects, this version uses live action and animation. Gertie the dinosaur (1914?): Gertie the dinosaur eats trees, interacts with McCay, and surveys her surroundings. Origially released as various versions of combination live action and animated motion picture shorts circa 1909-1914.
Call # FILM Ma164
Genre  animation
Rare  yes
Online  yes; Internet Archive (Gertie)
Copyright status  public domain
Physical condition  good
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

This is actually in Super-8, not 16mm. 300+ libraries own the DVD Winsor McCay: The Master Edition, which collects his work. It may seem slightly egotistical to direct a film whose title dubs you “America’s Greatest Cartoonist,” but as both the creator of Little Nemo and a major pioneer of film animation, he was probably just being honest; he drew each frame of the film on paper, as cel animation had not been invented yet. The Gertie vaudeville tour involved lectures, live cartooning, and then a showing of the film in which McCay would interact with the dinosaur in a manner similar to a lion tamer. At the end, he disappeared behind a screen as an animated version of himself entered the film and rode away on Gertie’s head. Originally released 1914.

Who Makes Words (1948)

21 Dec
Director 
Producer   Coronet Instructional Films
Contributors   Educational collaborator, Viola Theman
Length   10 min
B&W/Color   b&w
UO Library Catalog description:  Shows how new words come into a language–by borrowing from another language, by inventing to meet new needs, and by changing the spelling or meaning of existing words. For intermediate and junior high school grades.
Call # FILM Ma143
Genre  instructional
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Title should have interrogation mark, ironic since Viola Theman was also the consultant on the Coronet film Punctuation–Mark Your Meaning.
Coronet was a juggernaut of instructional films in the 1940s-1970s. Many are available at the Internet Archive.

Who Did What To Whom (1972)

21 Dec
Director   Written and directed by R.F. Mager
Producer   Mager Associates, released by Research Press Co.
Contributors   Filmed by Dick Ham Productions
Length   17 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  A training film for educational, religious, or industrial leaders which shows how to recognize the four principles of behavior: positive reinforcement, negative reinforcement, extinction, and punishment.
Call # FILM Mb240
Genre  instructional
Rare  no
Online  no
Copyright status  protected
Physical condition fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Robert F. Mager was an educational psychologist who worked in industrial training before he became disillusioned with the teacher-focused mode of instruction. He helped developed a learner-centered mode of teaching. He published numerous books and articles on designing learning objectives, and instructional design. The film is oddly pretty watercolored “focus” screen. Groovy organ music. Mainly brief vignettes in which actors demonstrate different styles of interaction at work and home, followed by commentary from narrator; a pleasantly stilted, charming film which shows how to do everything in the entire world wrong. Ends with a pieing.

We Have Seen Their Faces (1967)

21 Dec
Director 
Producer   School of Social Work, University of Washington, and KCTS-TV; released by Capital Film Services
Contributors 
Length   40 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:
Call # FILM Md16
Genre  instructional
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  public domain
Physical condition  fair (reel 1); good (reel 2)
Oregon-related no

Notes:

Catalog says only that it’s about counseling and social work. An Aug. 1968 article in the journal Psychiatric Services dates this film at 1967, and says that it was produced by KCTS-TV for the Western Interstate Commission on Higher Education.

Ways To Settle Disputes (1949)

21 Dec
Director 
Producer   Coronet Instructional Films
Contributors   Educational Collaborator, Carter Davidson
Length   11 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  An examination of four ways of resolving disputes: compromise, following rules, finding the facts upon which the argument is based, and finding opinions of others who witness the situation.
Call # FILM Ma103
Genre  instructional
Rare  yes
Online  yes; Internet Archive
Copyright status  public domain
Physical condition  poor
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Carter Davidson (PhD, English, University of Chicago, 1930) was the president of Knox College in Illinois, and Union College in Schenectady, NY. He also consulted on the Coronet film Why We Respect the Law. Coronet Instructional Films was a major educational film producer 1950-1970s.

Watts Library Reaches Out (1963)

21 Dec
Director 
Producer   Board of Library Commissioners of the city of Los Angeles. Released by ACI Films
Contributors 
Length   19 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  Describes the community outreach program of the Watts Branch of the Los Angeles Public Library which includes children’s story and craft programs, festivals, tricycle races, workshops, and other activities.
Call # FILM Mb164
Genre  documentary
Rare  yes
Online  no
Copyright status  public domain
Physical condition  fair
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Only two years before the infamous riots of ’65. I wish more information were available on the intended audience of the film.

Voyager 2 Encounters Saturn: Computer Simulation (1981)

21 Dec
Director   James F. Blinn and Charles Kohlhase
Producer   Anaheim, Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Contributors 
Length   6 min
B&W/Color   color
UO Library Catalog description:  Includes time-lapse of rotations of Saturn and its rings. (Listed in UO Catalog as “Voyager 2 Encounters Saturn,” but this is the tin title.)
Call # FILM Ma208
Genre  documentary
Rare  no
Online  no
Copyright status  public domain
Physical condition good
Oregon-related  no

Notes:

Narration begins abruptly a few minutes in after a silent lead-in; may be deliberate, seems more likely a flaw in the film. One of a series. There’s an excellent interview with Kohlhase here in which he explains the creation of these animations at length:

“A personally exciting time for me was when Jim Blinn, one of the great pioneers in computer graphics, and I worked on the flyby animations. We’d been doing just simple wire-frame animations before. Jim was hired at JPL to work with me – my budget paid his salary – and he developed software to simulate the flybys, and then I would use them to make each little movie script. We worked as a pair. We did Voyager 1 and 2 — in sequence — Voyager 1 at Jupiter; Voyager 2 at Jupiter, Voyager 1 at Saturn, and so on.

It was great to see the finished product. Since we released these before the flybys, one of the challenges we had in making the movies was that before we got to these planets we didn’t know what the moons actually looked like up close, so we had {renowned space artists} Don Davis, and later Rick Sternbach, work with us. Don helped us render surfaces of things for best guesses when we didn’t know what they actually looked like. We would imagine what the surfaces would look like and Don would paint them. But once Voyager 1 arrived and took the real pictures, we would quickly patch the photographs of the real moons on the animation before we made the Voyager 2 animations. So the second in the series was always better.”

Blinn pioneered, among other CGI techniques, bump mapping (rendering of lumpy surfaces) and reflection mapping. While the film is not relentlessly fascinating, it’s certainly an interesting piece of CGI history.

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